Responses to Candidate Questionnaire: Radioactive Waste in the Ottawa Valley

September 13, 2021

We asked federal candidates from all parties in 13 ridings in West Quebec, Eastern Ontario and Ottawa the following questions:

  • Will you oppose the current plans for a radioactive waste disposal facility at Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.?
  • Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups?
  • Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley?
  • Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear Laboratories?


Here are the replies we received from 15 candidates. (Answers are in the language in which they were provided.)

GATINEAU

GLENGARRY-PRESCOTT-RUSSELL

HULL-AYLMER

KANATA – CARLETON

NEPEAN

OTTAWA CENTRE

OTTAWA–WEST NEPEAN

PONTIAC

RENFREW-NIPISSING-PEMBROKE 

NDP TEAM (possibly Ottawa Centre, riding was not identified in the response)

Chalk River Laboratories on the Ottawa River, site of proposed giant radioactive waste mound.

GATINEAU

Geneviève Nadeau – Bloc Québécois 

Il me fait plaisir de vous mentionner que dans la plateforme du Bloc Québécois, nous avons indiqué que le Bloc Québécois s’opposera au développement du nucléaire, incluant les petits réacteurs modulaires, et à tout risque pour le Québec de contamination aux déchets nucléaires qu’impliquent des projets comme le dépotoir de Chalk River, le long de la rivière des Outaouais.

Nous ne pouvons être crédible dans notre volonté de lutter pour la préservation de notre environnement tout en continuant d’investir dans le développement du nucléaire.

Je vous invite à en apprendre plus sur notre plateforme en suivant ce lien blocquebecois.org/plateforme

Mathieu St-Jean – PPC 

Je vais prendre en considération les éléments que vous m’avez apporté.

Pour moi, l’environnement est très important. Un projet comme celui-ci doit être regardé avec attention. Mettre un tombeau nucléaire qui se déverse dans un rivière ou un lac est une menace pour l’environnement et pour les citoyens qui tirent leur eau potable de la rivière.

Maintenant, qu’elles sont les alternatives possibles pour régler ce problème. Telle est la question qui devrait être posée.

Pour moi, un député est un défenseur des Canadiens à tous les niveaux. Il me fera plaisir de travailler avec nos frères amérindiens à la défense de nos terres.

GLENGARRY-PRESCOTT-RUSSELL 

Konstantine Malakos – NDP 


I absolutely oppose this project. I actually had a fireside chat on my Facebook page on the topic recently. 

· Will you oppose the current plans for a radioactive waste disposal facility at Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.?

 Yes

· Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups?

 Yes with more focus on Indigenous leaders 

· Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley?

 Yes

· Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear Laboratories? 

Yes

HULL-AYLMER

Eric Fleury – PPC 

Le dossier de l’environnement en est un de taille pour moi-même autant que notre parti, et bien que le nucléaire soit une des formes d’énergies que l’on devra favoriser afin de réduire nos émissions en carbone, il est essentiel de ne pas sous-estimer les risques environnementaux potentiels associés aux déchets que ces centrales peuvent produire.

Tout projet, incluant celui-ci, devra faire l’objet d’un processus rigoureux de consultation ainsi que de robustes analyses environnementales. Le nucléaire, oui, mais jamais au détriment de l’environnement ou de la sécurité des citoyens. Je ne suis ni physicien, ni biologiste, par contre, je me fierai aux experts indépendants afin de déterminer le moyen le plus sûr de disposer de ces déchets et résidus.

KANATA – CARLETON

Jennifer Purdy – Green Party

Yes to all of the questions. Also, the Green Party will ban the development of nuclear power in Canada.

NEPEAN

Gordon Kubanek – Green Party

Re, nuclear waste : Yes, I support your desired changes.


OTTAWA CENTRE

Angela Keller-Herzog – Green Party

·         Will you oppose the current plans for a radioactive waste disposal facility at Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.?

Yes

·         Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups? 

Yes. The current consultation process is not working. There are First Nations and community groups saying their concerns are being disregarded.   Decision-making needs to be transparent and accessible, documented and grounded in reason.  

·         Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley?

The fact that a regional assessment has been requested by the Council of the City of Ottawa and then declined by the federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change is disturbing. These decisions will affect residents and the environment for thousands of years. I will continue to press for a comprehensive assessment. 

·         Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear Laboratories?

I believe that such a review should be undertaken by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada and would be pleased to recommend such. In the event that I am not elected, I may pursue such a recommendation either as an individual citizen or with the support of a group of local civil society organizations or by means of a public petition.

Yasir Naqvi – Liberal

Thank you for writing to me about CNL’s planned disposal facility in Chalk River. 

I am committed to ensuring that Ottawa residents’ concerns on Chalk River continue to be heard. I know that protecting our waterways is of vital importance.

My understanding is that as part of the ongoing environmental assessment process led by the independent Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), members of the public, as well as local communities and elected officials submitted comments on the draft Environmental Impact Statement for the project. Subsequently, on July 2, 2021, CNSC staff completed their review of Canadian Nuclear Laboratories’ (CNL) submission of the final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the proposed facility and determined that the information provided in CNL’s submission is complete.

CNSC staff will proceed with the preparation of the Environmental Assessment Report, which will be made available for review by Indigenous groups and the public prior to a public Commission hearing. Further to this, I understand that the CNSC Commission Secretariat will now proceed with scheduling public hearing dates, and further details regarding how to participate will be provided once the Commission Secretariat has announced the hearing dates.

I will continue to follow this issue closely and I would encourage you to continue to engage in the independent process. I will certainly engage with the Minister responsible should I be elected as the Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre.

OTTAWA–WEST NEPEAN

Anita Vandenbeld – Liberal

Thank you for writing to me about CNL’s planned disposal facility in Chalk River and for your continued advocacy on this issue. I, along with my colleagues in the National Capital Region, have been following the issue very closely. Currently there is a process in place which has allowed for input to be made by members of the public, as well as local communities and elected officials. I understand there will also be an opportunity to review the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Environmental Assessment Report and public hearings which will soon be scheduled by the CNSC Commission Secretariat. Protecting our waterways is crucial and I encourage you to continue engaging with the process. I will continue to follow this important issue.  

PONTIAC

Denise Giroux – NDP

1.  Will you oppose the current plans for the radioactive waste disposal facility at Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.?

YES. Like you, I share a sense of urgency in opposing plans for both these ill-conceived ideas. They must be abandoned and a new site identified for a facility which can protect the Ottawa River by containing and isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere.

I am trying to raise awareness and action at every opportunity available to me on this issue. Your groups’ knowledge, engagement, and advocacy are critical to our collective efforts to stopping their progress while we work together to bring a true science-based approach and greater accountability to nuclear waste management.

2.  Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups?

In my mind, accountability is the most important issue in this fight right now. Canada needs a democratic process for making these decisions. Successive governments have effectively managed to hide the truth by delegating responsibility to unelected and unaccountable corporations and members of a nuclear-friendly Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. Since 2015, when the Liberal government signed the contract with CNL, the MP for Pontiac refused to speak out about this arrangement and the dangers it poses to the region, preferring instead to utter words about “listening to the science” and “encourage” individuals’ to participate in the Commission’s pseudo-consultation process. The Liberal incumbent tried to imply that the process was sufficient safeguard and ordinary Canadians could trust the Commission to get it right. He completely failed in his responsibility as an Environmental lawyer to tell the truth about what real science and international law dictates if human safety and biodiversity are to be truly protected.

I am a lawyer, too, one with a long record of speaking up for people whose voices are often ignored by the powers that be, and I refuse to stand idly by, as the former MP did, while these projects forge ahead. Nearly 40 Indigenous groups, along with 6 million people downstream from these projects, through their community groups and municipalities, have tried to voice their opposition to these plans. All of them, for all intents and purposes, have been shut-out in favour of nuclear promoters. Their concerns are “noted” and ignored by CNL on its way to checking off the administrative boxes to approving faulty, expeditious plans.

Elected representatives should be responsible for these matters, alongside local Indigenous communities as equal partners; it is they who should decide if the “NSDF”project (near-surface disposal facility) is acceptable. As you rightly say, it is being funded by taxpayer dollars, will take place on ‘federal’ land (in fact, unceded Algonquin territory), and concerns the federal government’s own waste. Real public consultation is needed, to give effect to the widespread opposition to current plans and identify responsible solutions.

As the MP for Pontiac, I would meet with these Indigenous groups early, along with the dozens of municipalities on both sides of the Outaouais–to help coordinate the efforts of all those who have passed resolutions opposing the CNL’s plans and asking for proper assessments to be done.

Once elected, I will be vocal on this issue. I will work hard to bring my caucus colleagues and other party representatives up to speed, alongside Richard Canning, the NDP MP from Vancouver who has been the party’s critic on this file. I will certainly meet with your groups, too, to determine next steps.

3.  Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley?

Minister Wilkinson’s rejection of municipal/regional requests for Impact Assessments underscores the Trudeau government’s resistance to accountability and transparency on this issue, despite their talk of protecting the environment. He and his government are doing everything to keep all of this off the public radar.

My past experience with a Regional Affordable Housing Task Force taught me the importance of bringing all affected parties together to develop a transparent, consensus-based process and arrive at a responsible outcome. I am certain that with transparency, the right people at the table, and a requirement that all decisions be based in best practices, the outcome arrived at would be in line with CANDOR’s proposals. We will find a safer alternative.

Much work has been done to educate the municipalities on these issues and they are critical allies in this fight. Their demands for regional assessments under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley are reasonable and doable, and I will do everything in my power, once elected, to support these demands.

4.  Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear Laboratories?

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission’s assertion that it considers CNL’s application for the radioactive waste disposal facility complete, including its environmental assessment and consultations with the community and First Nations, reveals the limitations of their useful role; in my mind, it reveals huge legal and ethical gaps in their commitment to human safety and protection of biodiversity. Its government-appointed members play a sad part pretending, (with CNL and the Canadian government), that their process is rational, rigorous and coherent, when it is in fact biased, half-baked, and misleading. Despite widespread opposition from scientists, international experts, the International Atomic Energy Agency, Indigenous and community groups, they simply ignore the concerns! The Commission has never refused a proposal, and CNL is so sure of obtaining approval once the administrative boxes are checked-off that it already ships large quantities of radioactive waste to Chalk River from other federal nuclear sites in Manitoba, southern Ontario and Quebec.

I believe the contract given by the federal government in 2015 to CNL to operate all federal nuclear facilities needs to be rescinded, not least because CNL failed to comply with the requirements of the IAEA for managing radioactive waste safely (eg. that a design for a waste facility be developed, and then a regional survey be done to find a suitable location). It seems clear that both CNL and the CNSC pressed their Liberal and Conservative friends in government, to simply move ahead. How to explain, otherwise, that neither the government nor the Commission even care to justify why CNL should be allowed to choose the “easiest route” instead of complying with best practices?

Instead of being entrusted to a private for-profit consortium the business of waste management should be delegated to a public agency with public safety and environmental stewardship as its top priorities. There is no place for a for-profit corporation–still less one known to be ethically-challenged. The fact that CNL has spent hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars trying to justify its plans since hastily proposing the landfill-type mound in 2015 is proof enough of that. What evil game are we caught in that we should pay to be fooled into believing CNL knows best?? It all underscores just how ready these 3 partners-in-negligence have been to cut corners and fill each others’ pockets while avoiding answering for their actions and inactions.

When a true public airing of these issues occurs, it will be clear to everyone that a landfill-type mound by a well-settled river is not suitable for medium-level radioactive waste.

The fact is that the proposed mound at Chalk River and the entombment of a nuclear reactor at Rolphton are entirely inadequate to contain radioactive substances. CNL’s plans for waste management are irresponsible. Given the planned expectation that the membrane for the football fields-high mound of waste will deteriorate in less than 50 years despite knowing the materials piled there remain dangerous for thousands of years, it guarantees the Ottawa River will be permanently contaminated. The Commission’s approval and the government’s efforts to “greenwash” all of it, are shameful lies to the Canadian public, and just more shoulder-shrugging of Indigenous groups’ concern for the earth and its people. It is all evidence of just how closely tied the current government is to those who would profit from the destruction of our waterways and lands.

Letting Canada’s nuclear “regulator,” the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, make final decisions on their plan is an abdication of responsibility by the Government of Canada. These are not ordinary regulatory matters. The overwhelming evidence demands that we do exactly what you propose: enact strict regulations to keep radioactive waste out of the biosphere, build state of the art facilities for radioactive waste, reform the nuclear governance system to ensure that radioactive waste is managed according to best international practices and standards; and, take profit out of radioactive waste management.

These decisions will have major impacts on future generations and our environment forever. With your help, working together, I will work tirelessly on this issue, until common sense and reason prevail.

——————————-

Réponse de Denise Giroux, NDP Pontiac :

1.  Vous opposerez-vous aux projets actuels de construction d’une installation de gestion des déchets radioactifs près de la surface à Chalk River et de mise en tombeau d’un réacteur à Rolphton, en Ontario?

OUI. Comme vous, je partage un sentiment d’urgence en m’opposant aux plans pour ces deux idées mal conçues. Il faut les abandonner et trouver un nouveau site pour une installation qui puisse protéger la rivière des Outaouais en contenant et en isolant les déchets radioactifs de la biosphère.

J’essaie de sensibiliser et d’agir à chaque occasion qui m’est offerte sur cette question. Les connaissances, l’engagement et la défense de vos groupes sont essentiels à nos efforts collectifs pour arrêter leur progression alors que nous travaillons ensemble pour apporter une véritable approche scientifique et une plus grande responsabilité à la gestion des déchets nucléaires.

2.  Vous assurerez-vous que les décisions concernant la gestion des déchets radioactifs dans la vallée de l’Outaouais seront prises par les députés élus et les groupes autochtones?

À mon avis, la responsabilité est la question la plus importante dans ce combat en ce moment. Le Canada a besoin d’un processus démocratique pour prendre ces décisions. Les gouvernements successifs ont réussi à cacher la vérité en déléguant la responsabilité à des sociétés non élues et non redevables et aux membres d’une Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire favorable au nucléaire. Depuis 2015, lorsque le gouvernement libéral a signé le contrat avec CNL, le député de Pontiac a refusé de s’exprimer sur cet arrangement et les dangers qu’il représente pour la région, préférant prononcer des mots se voulant rassurant sur la notion “d’écouter la science” et d’encourager “les individus” à participer au pseudo-consultations de la Commission. Le député libéral sortant a tenté de laisser entendre que ce processus était une garantie suffisante et que les Canadiens pouvaient y faire confiance pour faire les choses correctement. Il a complètement failli à sa responsabilité en tant qu’avocat de l’environnement de dire la vérité sur ce que la science réelle et le droit international dictent si la sécurité humaine et la biodiversité doivent être vraiment protégées.

Je suis également avocate, et j’ai une longue expérience de la défense des personnes dont la voix est souvent ignorée par les pouvoirs en place; je refuse de rester les bras croisés, comme l’a fait l’ancien député, alors que ces projets vont de l’avant. Près de 40 groupes autochtones, ainsi que 6 millions de personnes en aval de ces projets, par l’intermédiaire de leurs associations communautaires et de leurs municipalités, ont tenté d’exprimer leur opposition à ces plans. Tous, à toutes fins utiles, ont été écartés au profit des promoteurs du nucléaire. Leurs préoccupations sont “notées” et ignorées par CNL qui s’apprête à cocher les cases administratives pour approuver des plans défectueux et expéditifs.

Les représentants élus devraient être responsables de ces questions, aux côtés des communautés indigènes locales en tant que partenaires égaux ; ce sont eux qui devraient décider si le projet “IGDPS” (installation de gestion des déchets près de la surface) est acceptable. Comme vous le dites à juste titre, il est financé par l’argent des contribuables, se déroulera sur des terres “fédérales” (en fait, des territoires algonquins non cédés) et concerne les déchets du gouvernement fédéral. Une véritable consultation publique est nécessaire, afin de concrétiser l’opposition généralisée aux plans actuels et d’identifier des solutions responsables.

En tant que députée du Pontiac, je rencontrerais ces groupes autochtones dès le début, ainsi que les douzaines de municipalités des deux côtés de l’Outaouais, pour aider à coordonner les efforts de tous ceux qui ont adopté des résolutions s’opposant aux plans de la CNL et demandant que des évaluations appropriées soient faites.

Une fois élue, je me ferai entendre sur cette question. Je travaillerai fort pour mettre mes collègues du caucus et les autres représentants du parti au courant, aux côtés de Richard Canning, le député néo-démocrate de Vancouver qui a été le porte-parole du parti dans ce dossier. Je ne manquerai pas de rencontrer vos groupes également, afin de déterminer les prochaines étapes.

3.  Lancerez-vous une évaluation régionale en vertu de la Loi sur l’évaluation d’impact du déclassement des installations nucléaires, de la gestion des déchets radioactifs et de l’assainissement des terres contaminées sur les terres fédérales dans la vallée de l’Outaouais?

Le rejet par le ministre Wilkinson des demandes municipales/régionales d’évaluation d’impact souligne la résistance du gouvernement Trudeau à la responsabilité et à la transparence sur cette question, malgré ses beaux discours sur la protection de l’environnement. Lui et son gouvernement font tout pour que tout cela échappe au radar public.

Mon expérience passée au sein d’un groupe de travail régional sur le logement abordable m’a enseigné l’importance de réunir toutes les parties concernées afin d’élaborer un processus transparent et consensuel et de parvenir à un résultat responsable. Je suis certain qu’avec la transparence, les bonnes personnes à la table et l’exigence que toutes les décisions soient fondées sur les meilleures pratiques, le résultat obtenu serait conforme aux propositions de CANDOR. Nous trouverons une solution plus sûre.

Beaucoup de travail a été fait pour éduquer les municipalités sur ces questions et elles sont des alliées essentielles dans cette lutte. Leurs demandes d’évaluations régionales, en vertu de la Loi sur les études d’impact, du déclassement des installations nucléaires, de la gestion des déchets radioactifs et de l’assainissement des terrains contaminés sur les terres fédérales de la vallée de l’Outaouais sont raisonnables et réalisables, et je ferai tout ce qui est en mon pouvoir, une fois élue, pour appuyer ces demandes.

4.  Vous engagerez-vous à entreprendre un examen public du contrat de 10 ans signé entre le gouvernement du Canada et les sociétés propriétaires des Laboratoires Nucléaires Canadiens?

L’affirmation de la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire selon laquelle elle considère que la demande de CNL pour l’installation du dépotoir de déchets radioactifs est complète, y compris son évaluation environnementale et ses consultations avec la communauté et les Premières nations, révèle les limites de son rôle ; à mon avis, elle révèle d’énormes lacunes juridiques et éthiques dans son mandat et son engagement envers la sécurité humaine et la protection de la biodiversité. Ses membres nommés par le gouvernement jouent en un rôle complice en prétendant (avec CNL et le gouvernement canadien) que leur processus est rationnel, rigoureux et cohérent, alors qu’il est en fait biaisé, partial et trompeur. Malgré l’opposition généralisée des scientifiques, des experts internationaux, de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique, des groupes autochtones et communautaires, ils ignorent tout simplement toutes leurs préoccupations ! La Commission n’a jamais refusé une proposition, et CNL est tellement sûre d’obtenir l’approbation une fois les cases administratives cochées qu’elle expédie déjà à Chalk River de grandes quantités de déchets radioactifs provenant d’autres sites nucléaires fédéraux au Manitoba, dans le sud de l’Ontario et au Québec.

Je pense que le contrat signé par le gouvernement fédéral en 2015 à CNL pour exploiter toutes les installations nucléaires fédérales doit être annulé, notamment parce que CNL n’a pas respecté les exigences de l’AIEA pour gérer les déchets radioactifs en toute sécurité (par exemple, qu’une conception pour une installation de déchets soit élaborée, puis qu’une étude régionale soit réalisée pour trouver un emplacement approprié). Il semble évident que la CNL et certains de leurs ami.e.s au sein de la CCSN ont fait pression sur leurs amis libéraux et conservateurs pour qu’ils aillent tout simplement de l’avant. Comment expliquer, sinon, que ni le gouvernement ni la Commission ne se soucient même de justifier pourquoi CNL devrait être autorisée à choisir la “ voie la plus facile ” au lieu de se conformer aux meilleures pratiques ?

Au lieu d’être confiée à un consortium privé à but lucratif, la gestion des déchets devrait être déléguée à une agence publique dont les priorités sont la sécurité publique et la gestion de l’environnement. Il n’y a pas de place pour une société à but lucratif, et encore moins pour une société connue pour ses problèmes d’éthique. Le fait que CNL ait dépensé des centaines de millions de dollars de l’argent des contribuables pour tenter de justifier ses plans depuis qu’elle a hâtivement proposé le monticule énorme en 2015 en est une preuve suffisante. Dans quel jeu diabolique sommes-nous pris pour payer afin d’être trompés en croyant que CNL sait mieux que quiconque ? Tout cela souligne à quel point ces 3 partenaires-en-négligence ont été prêts à couper les coins ronds et à se remplir les poches les uns des autres tout en évitant de répondre de leurs actions et inactions.

Lorsqu’un véritable débat public sur ces questions aura lieu, il sera clair pour toute personne qu’un monticule énorme près d’une rivière bien établie ne convient pas aux déchets radioactifs de moyen niveau.

Le fait est que le monticule proposé à Chalk River et l’enterrement d’un réacteur nucléaire à Rolphton sont totalement inadaptés pour contenir les substances radioactives. Les plans de CNL pour la gestion des déchets sont irresponsables. Étant donné que l’on s’attend à ce que la membrane du monticule de déchets de la hauteur d’un terrain de football se détériore en moins de 50 ans, même si l’on sait que les matières qui y sont entassées demeurent dangereuses pendant des milliers d’années, cela garantit que la rivière des Outaouais sera contaminée de façon permanente. L’approbation de la Commission et les efforts du gouvernement pour ” écologiser ” le tout sont des mensonges honteux à la population canadienne, et qu’un haussement d’épaule de plus face aux préoccupations des groupes autochtones voulant protéger la terre et ses habitants. Tout cela montre à quel point le gouvernement actuel est lié à ceux qui veulent profiter de la destruction de nos cours d’eau et de nos terres.

Laisser le “régulateur” nucléaire du Canada (la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire) prendre les décisions finales sur leur plan est une abdication de responsabilité de la part du gouvernement du Canada. Il ne s’agit pas de questions réglementaires ordinaires. Les preuves accablantes exigent que nous fassions exactement ce que vous proposez : promulguer des règlements stricts pour empêcher les déchets radioactifs d’entrer dans la biosphère, construire des installations de pointe pour les déchets radioactifs, réformer le système de gouvernance nucléaire pour s’assurer que les déchets radioactifs sont gérés selon les meilleures pratiques et normes internationales, et retirer le profit de la gestion des déchets radioactifs.

Ces décisions auront un impact majeur sur les générations futures et sur notre environnement à jamais. Avec votre aide, en travaillant ensemble, je travaillerai sans relâche sur cette question, jusqu’à ce que le bon sens et la raison l’emportent.

Gabrielle Desjardins – Bloc Québécois

La solution au problème énergétique canadien ne passe pas par le nucléaire. Le Bloc Québécois s’oppose au développement du nucléaire, incluant les petits réacteurs modulaires, et à tout risque pour le Québec de contamination aux déchets nucléaires qu’impliquent des projets comme le dépotoir de Chalk River, le long de la rivière des Outaouais.

Dans tous les cas, le fédéral doit se doter d’un plan de gestion des déchets nucléaires. L’option telle que proposée à Chalk River n’est pas acceptable et n’est pas suffisamment sécuritaire. Un réel plan de gestion des déchets s’assurerait d’obtenir l’approbation des communautés du Québec et de l’Ontario concernées et tiendrait compte des risques de contaminations du sol et des cours d’eau.

Le Bloc Québécois est fermement opposé à la gestion des déchets nucléaires et s’inquiète des impacts négatifs qu’auront ceux-ci sur la qualité de l’eau de la rivière des Outaouais et du fleuve Saint-Laurent.

Michel Gauthier – Candidat conservateur 

J’ai déjà pris position contre le projet d’enfouissement de déchets
nucléaires de Chalk River, il y a quelques mois, et mon opinion demeure
la même aujourd’hui.

Ce projet est loin d’obtenir la norme de l’acceptabilité sociale et ne
doit pas aller de l’avant tant et aussi longtemps qu’une étude sérieuse
de sites alternatifs, loin des régions peuplées, n’aura été faite et que
la population aura été clairement informée. Aussi, le choix d’un site
doit aller plus loin qu’une simple évaluation des coûts.

Il est plutôt étonnant d’avoir choisi une colline dont l’écoulement des
eaux se fait directement vers la rivière des Outaouais, un cours d’eaux
dont le bassin direct dessert plus de 2 millions d’habitants.

Je serais également favorable à ce que tout le processus actuel fasse
l’objet d’une étude, au besoin, afin de s’assurer qu’il suive des
critères objectifs et soit hors de toute influence intéressée.

 Shaughn McArthur – Green Party / Parti vert

Thank you for these questions, and for your leadership and engagement on this critical issue.

I have attached my statement on Chalk River, as well as a petition I will be promoting throughout my campaign. This issue will be a central focus of an event we’ll be hosting at Mary-Ann Phillips Park on Sunday, 5 September, towards the end of my Paddle for a Livable Future. We welcome any help you may be able to offer in mobilizing your supporters around this event, and would welcome a representative of your group delivering some remarks during the event. 

In short, my answer to all your questions is an emphatic “YES!”

Sophie Chatel – Liberal

La santé et la sécurité des Canadiens et la protection de notre environnement demeurent la priorité du Parti libéral. Malheureusement, la plupart de ces déchets ont été créés il y a des décennies, sous la direction du Parti conservateur, et se trouvent actuellement dans des sites partout au Canada. Il est impératif que si le projet de Chalk River avance, qu’il respecte les normes internationales pour le stockage des déchets nucléaires de faible teneur et est rigoureusement surveillé pour assurer qu’aucune matière radioactive ne s’infiltre dans la rivière des Outaouais.

Les évaluations environnementales continues ont donné plusieurs occasions au public, aux communautés autochtones et aux parties intéressées de fournir des commentaires et de soumettre des commentaires, jusqu’à et y compris une audience publique. À ce jour, le processus de consultation publique a conduit à des changements dans la conception du projet reflétant l’importance de la consultation et de l’engagement dans ce projet.

Si je suis élu  député, je m’engage à suivre de très près le projet . Il est important de reconnaître l’expertise scientifique de ces organismes, mais nous devons également rester informés et critiques afin d’assurer la sécurité de notre communauté. Je demanderai à la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire des mises à jour régulières sur l’état du projet ainsi que des consultations et des commentaires du public. Il est essentiel que le gouvernement exerce une surveillance à toute épreuve sur les entrepreneurs privés afin de s’assurer que le projet respecte toutes les normes internationales pertinentes. La santé et la sécurité des gens de Pontiac est ma priorité absolue tout au long de ce projet.

/ /

The health and safety of Canadians and the protection of our environment remain the priority of the Liberal Party. The fact is that most of this waste was created decades ago, under a Conservative Party leadership, and is currently sitting in sites across Canada. It is imperative that if the Chalk River project goes ahead, it meets international standards for the storing of low-grade nuclear waste and is rigorously monitored to ensure that no radioactive materials leach into the Ottawa River.

Continual environmental assessments have allowed for several opportunities for the public, indigenous communities, and interested parties to provide input and to submit comments, up to and including a public hearing. To date, the public comment process has led to changes in the project design reflecting the importance of consultation and engagement in this project.

Should I be elected, I commit to monitoring the project extremely closely. While it is important to acknowledge these parties’ scientific expertise on the matter, we must also remain informed and critical to ensure the safety of our community. I will request regular updates from the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission on the status of the project as well as consultations and public input. It is essential for the government to provide iron-clad oversight over private contractors to ensure that the project meets all relevant international standards. The health and safety of the people of Pontiac is my top priority through the course of this project.

RENFREW-NIPISSING-PEMBROKE 

Stefan Klietsch – Independent Candidate 

Will you oppose the current plans for a radioactive waste disposal facility at Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.?

Yes, I do oppose the current plans for radioactive waste disposal at Chalk River and Rolphton.

 Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups?

Yes, I would ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups.


Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley?

Yes, I would initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste, and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa Valley.


Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear Laboratories?

I am reluctant to potentially abrogate a Government of Canada contract, given the resulting uncertainty that would therefore result in future Government of Canada dealings with businesses.  However, I would commit to a public review on any possibility of renewing the contract.

NDP TEAM Response: Radioactive waste in the Ottawa Valley

1. Will you oppose the current plans for a radioactive waste disposal facility at  Chalk River and reactor entombment at Rolphton, Ont.? 

Yes, New Democrats have raised concerns about the Liberal government’s handling  of nuclear waste regulations. 

2. Will you ensure that decisions on radioactive waste disposal in the Ottawa  Valley are made by elected officials and Indigenous groups? 

Yes, policy decisions should not be left in the hands of industry, New Democrats  want to see elected officials make these decisions, following consultation with  indigenous groups. 

3. Will you initiate a regional assessment under the Impact Assessment Act of  the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, management of radioactive waste,  and remediation of contaminated lands on federally owned lands in the Ottawa  Valley? 

Yes, if elected, the NDP would support the City of Ottawa’s request for a regional  assessment. 

4. Will you commit to a public review of the 10-year contract between the  Government of Canada and the corporations that own Canadian Nuclear  

Laboratories? 

Yes, New Democrats commit to bringing accountability, transparency, and oversight  to public contracts and how federal funding is allocated. We have previously  expressed concern over the privatization of nuclear facilities under the Conservative  and Liberal governments. 

Regards, 

The NDP Team]

One thought on “Responses to Candidate Questionnaire: Radioactive Waste in the Ottawa Valley

Leave a Reply to Responses to Candidate Questionnaire: Radioactive Waste in the Ottawa Valley — Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area « nuclear-news Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s