Letter to Auditor General Michael Ferguson, August 21, 2018

La version française suit

August 21, 2018

Michael Ferguson
Auditor General of Canada
240 Sparks Street
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G6
Dear Mr. Ferguson

We are writing to express as an urgent matter our deep concern that the Government of Canada is failing to meet its commitments to sustainable development in its handling of radioactive waste and nuclear reactor decommissioning and in the regulation of these activities. We are also concerned that money is being spent by Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) without due regard for economy, efficiency, and environmental protection. We believe these failures and inappropriate expenditures of public funds create serious risks to the health of current and future generations of Canadians and our environment.

In May 2014, the Government of Canada “launched” the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Limited (CNL) as a “wholly-owned subsidiary” of AECL.  In 2015, the Government of Canada entered into a “Government-owned, Contractor-operated” (GoCo) arrangement with the multinational consortium Canadian National Energy Alliance (CNEA), giving the consortium all the shares in CNL, and awarding contracts (to both CNL and CNEA) to manage all of Canada’s federally-owned nuclear facilities.

AECL itself was reduced to a 40-person contract management organization with a mandate to “enable nuclear science and technology and fulfill Canada’s radioactive waste and decommissioning responsibilities.”  These “responsibilities” include dealing with a federal nuclear liability estimated at over $7.9 billion as of 31 March 2016 (1).

One of the contracts between AECL and CNL emphasizes speed in reducing this liability:

1.3.5.4 CNL shall seek the fastest, most cost effective way(s) of executing the DWM [Decommissioning and Waste Management] Mission including disposal of all waste. (emphasis added)

In the first three fiscal years of the GoCo arrangement (2016-17, 2017-18, 2018-19), Parliamentary appropriations to AECL for “nuclear decommissioning and radioactive waste management” averaged $547,577,479 per year.  This represented a four-fold increase over the $137,800,000 per year appropriated during the 2006/08 to 2015-16 period when decommissioning and waste management was funded by Natural Resources Canada through the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program.

It does not appear that increased funding has yielded good results.  CNL, supported by AECL, is proposing three projects that do not meet Canada’s international commitments for responsible radioactive waste management:

  • An above-ground landfill for one million cubic meters of “low level” radioactive waste, including significant quantities of long-lived alpha and beta/gamma emitters, beside the Ottawa River at Chalk River, Ontario.   The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) says above-ground disposal is unsuitable for waste with long-lived radionuclides.  It recommends isolating such waste from the biosphere below ground for the duration of its radiological hazard (3).
  • “Entombment” of the Whiteshell-1 reactor beside the Winnipeg River in Pinawa, Manitoba; and of the Nuclear Power Demonstration reactor beside the Ottawa River in Rolphton, Ontario.  During entombment, the highly radioactive remains of the reactor would be covered in concrete and left in place, even though they contain radionuclides that will remain hazardous for hundreds of thousands of years beyond the lifetime of their concrete “tombs”. The IAEA does not recommend reactor entombment except in emergencies (4).

These projects are mired in controversy.  Their environmental assessments have been delayed owing to numerous critical comments submitted by provincial and federal government agencies, retired AECL scientists, First Nations, and NGOs. Contracting for the fastest and cheapest “disposal of all waste” creates perverse incentives to downplay negative environmental effects of the projects, to place undue burdens on future generations, and to ignore sustainable development principles.

We are concerned that “entombment” may be under consideration for other federally- owned defunct nuclear reactors, such as the Gentilly-1 reactor at Becancour, Quebec; the Douglas Point reactor near Kincardine, Ontario; and the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River, Ontario.  We are also concerned that Canada may be actively promoting entombment internationally and pressuring the IAEA to sanction “entombment” for routine decommissioning. These concerns are addressed in a new environmental petition entitled “Need for a national policy on decommissioning of nuclear reactors”.

Environmental Petition 411, submitted to your office in September 2017, notes that the Government of Canada is grossly deficient in policies and strategies to guide the disposal or long-term management of the federal government’s 600,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste (excluding irradiated nuclear fuel) (5). The Government of Canada has only ever released a “Radioactive Waste Policy Framework” composed of three bullets (6). This “Framework”, developed with no public discussion or consultation, is now more than 20 years old. It states that waste owners must meet their responsibilities “in accordance with approved waste disposal plans.” However, the Government of Canada, as “owner” of the vast majority of Canada’s non-fuel radioactive wastes, has never released an approved plan for long-term management of its own wastes.

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) appears to be promoting the three nuclear waste disposal projects described above. As responsible authority under the Canadian Environment Assessment Act, CNSC initiated environmental assessments (EAs) of the projects even though they do not align with IAEA guidance. CNSC dismissed warnings from scientific experts about serious flaws in the three projects during the project description/scoping phase (7) (8) (9).  This allowed CNL to issue sub-contracts for environmental impact studies and for supporting documentation – a waste of millions of dollars of public funds.  CNSC’s mishandling of these EAs is the subject of Environmental Petition 413, submitted to your office in January 2018 (10).

CNSC is widely perceived to be subject to “regulatory capture” (11). To the extent that CNSC serves the interests of the industry it is supposed to regulate – rather than the interests of current and future generations of Canadians – this creates waste and inefficiency. We believe that Canada lacks checks and balances in its nuclear governance system, and that the involvement of multiple agencies and departments is needed to strengthen the system.

All of the above concerns lead to our urgent request that you undertake an inquiry into whether the Government of Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission are expending public funds for nuclear waste management and nuclear reactor decommissioning in a responsible manner, and whether they are handling these matter in ways that are compatible with sustainable development principles. We feel it is urgent to address these questions now, as Canada has just begun to face the monumentally difficult and expensive task of safely managing over seven decades’ accumulation of nuclear waste.

Yours truly,

Ole Hendrickson, Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area

Theresa McClenaghan, Canadian Environmental Law Association

 

Chief James Marsden, Alderville First Nation

Norm Odjick, Director General, Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council

Candace Day Neveau, Bawating Water Protectors

 

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance

Beatrice Olivastri, Friends of the Earth Canada

Brennain Lloyd, Northwatch

Cheryl Keetch, Ottawa River Institute

Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club Canada Foundation

Guy Garand, Conseil régional de l’environnement de Laval

Jocelyne Sanschagrin, Coalition Eau Secours

Mark Mattson, Swim, Drink, Fish Canada

Meg Sears, Prevent Cancer Now

Nicole DesRoches, Agence de bassin versant des 7

Patrick Nadeau, Ottawa Riverkeeper

Rob Barnes, Ecology Ottawa

Shawn-Patrick Stensil, Greenpeace Canada

 

Dr. Éric Notebaert, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Dr. Gordon Edwards, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility

Dr. P. T. Dang, Biodiversity Conservancy International

 

André Michel, Les Artistes pour la Paix

Carolynn Coburn, Environment Haliburton!

Céline Lachapelle, Action Environment Basses-Laurentides

Daniel Stringer, National Capital Peace Council

Dave Taylor, Concerned Citizens of Manitoba

Faye Moore, Port Hope Community Health Concerns Committee

Gareth Richardson, Green Coalition Verte

Georges Karpat, Coalition Vigilance Oléoducs

Gilles Provost and Ginette Charbonneau, Ralliement contre la pollution radioactive

Jamie Kneen, Mining Watch

Johanna Echlin, Old Fort William (Quebec) Cottagers’ Association

John Jackson, Nulcear Waste Watch

Janet McNeill, Durham Nuclear Awareness

Kirk Groover, Petawawa Point Cottagers’ Association

Louise Morand, Comité vigilance hydrocarbures de L’Assomption

Marc Brullemans, Regroupement vigilance hydrocarbures Québec

Marlyn Rannou,  l’Association pour la Préservation du Lac Témiscamingue

Martha Ruben, Ottawa Raging Grannies

Maryanne MacDonald, Water Care Allies, First United Church, Ottawa

Paul Johannis, Greenspace Alliance of Canada’s Capital

Réal Lalande, Action Climat Outaouais

Samuel Arnold, Sustainable Energy Group, New Brunswick

Siegfried (Ziggy) Kleinau, Bruce Peninsula Environment Group

 

cc.

The Right Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

Chief Perry Bellegarde, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations

Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of Environment and Sustainable Development, Canada

 

The Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Natural Resources, Canada

The Hon. Carolyn Bennett, MP, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Canada,

The Hon. Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Canada

The Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Minister of Health, Canada

 

Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party of Canada

Luc Thériault, Groupe parlementaire québécois

 

Mario Beaulieu, Bloc Québécois

 

Erin O’Toole, Conservative Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic, Canada

Shannon Stubbs, Conservative Party of Canada Natural Resources Critic

Marilyn Gladu, Conservative Party of Canada, Health Critic

Ed Fast, Conservative Party of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Critic

Hélène Laverdière, NDP Foreign Affairs Critic

Richard Cannings, NDP Natural Resources Critic

Don Davies, NDP Health Critic

Alexandre Boulerice, NDP Environment and Climate Change CriticMonique Pauzé, Groupe parlementaire québécois Environment Critic

 

The Hon. Isabelle Melançon, MNA, Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change, Québec

The Hon. Rod Phillips, MPP, Minister of the Environment, Conservation and Parks, Ontario

The Hon. Rochelle Squires, MLA, Minister of Sustainable Development, Manitoba

References

(1)  Report of the Auditor General of Canada to the Board of Directors of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Independent Audit Report, Special Examination – 2017.  Cat. No. FA3-126/2017E-PDF.  http://www.aecl.ca/site/media/aecl/2017_OAG_SE_AECL_En.pdf

(2) Canada’s Nuclear Legacy Liabilities: Cleanup Costs for the Chalk River Laboratories. Environmental Petition number 405 to the Auditor General of Canada, June 20, 2017, summary and response at http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/pet_405_e_42449.html, full text of petition at https://tinyurl.com/environmental-petition-405

(3) IAEA 2009. Policies and Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management. Nuclear Energy Series Guide No. NW-G-1.1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, https://wwwpub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1093_scr.pdf.

(4) IAEA 2011.  Policies and Strategies for the Decommissioning of Nuclear and Radiological Facilities.  Nuclear Energy Series No. NW-G-2.1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna.  https://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1525_web.pdf

(5) Policies and Strategies for Managing Non-Fuel Radioactive Waste.  Environmental Petition number 411 to the Auditor General of Canada, September 21, 2017, summary and response at http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/pet_411_e_42850.html, full text of petition at https://tinyurl.com/AG-petition-411

(6) Radioactive Waste Policy Framework. Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, 1996.   https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/uranium-nuclear/7725

(7)   CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Near Surface Disposal Facility Project.  http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80122/118862E.pdf

(8)   CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Nuclear Power Demonstration Closure Project.  http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80121/118857E.pdf

(9)   CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – In Situ Decommissioning of Whiteshell Reactor #1 Project.  http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80124/118863E.pdf

(10) Environmental Assessment of Nuclear Projects. Environmental Petition number 413 to the Auditor General of Canada, January 29, 2018, summary and response at, http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/pet_413_e_43085.html, full text of petition at https://tinyurl.com/Environmental-Petition-413

(11) Building Common Ground: A New Vision for Impact Assessment in Canada. The final report of the Expert Panel for the Review of Environmental Assessment Processes. April 2017. https://www.canada.ca/en/services/environment/conservation/assessments/environmental-reviews/environmental-assessment-processes/building-common-ground.html

 

requête VG français finale.pages

21 août 2018

Michael Ferguson
Vérificateur général du Canada 240 rue Sparks
Ottawa (Ontario) K1A 0G6

Cher M. Ferguson

Nous vous écrivons pour exprimer avec urgence notre grave préoccupation relative au fait que le gouvernement du Canada ne respecte pas ses engagements en faveur du développement durable dans le traitement des déchets radioactifs, dans le déclassement des réacteurs nucléaires et dans la réglementation de ces activités. Nous nous inquiétons aussi de voir Énergie atomique du Canada Limitée (EACL) dépenser tant d’argent sans égard à l’économie, à la performance ou à la protection de l’environnement. Nous croyons que ces défaillances et ce gaspillage des fonds publics mettent gravement en péril la santé des Canadiens présents et futurs ainsi que celle de notre environnement.

En mai 2014, le gouvernement du Canada a «lancé» les Laboratoires nucléaires canadiens Ltée. (CNL) à titre de «filiale en propriété exclusive» d’EACL. En 2015, le gouvernement du Canada a conclu avec le consortium multinational Canadian National Energy Alliance (CNEA) un accord «d’organisme gouvernemental exploité par un entrepreneur» (OGEE) en vertu duquel il cédait au consortium toutes les actions des LNC et confiait par contrat (à la fois aux LNC et à CNEA) la tâche de gérer toutes les installations nucléaires du gouvernement fédéral canadien.

EACL elle-même a été réduite à une organisation de 40 personnes qui gère ce contrat avec mandat de «mettre en œuvre la science et la technologie nucléaires et d’assumer les responsabilités du Canada en matière de déchets radioactifs et de déclassement». Ces « responsabilités » incluent la gestion d’obligations nucléaires fédérales que l’on évaluait à plus de 7,9 milliards $ au 31 mars 2016 (1)

L’un des contrats entre EACL et les LNC met l’accent sur la rapidité dans la réduction de ces obligations:

1.3.5.4 Les LNC rechercheront les moyens les plus rapides et les plus performants d’exécuter la mission DWM [Déclassement et gestion des déchets], et l’élimination de tous les déchets. (soulignement ajouté)

Au cours des trois premiers exercices de l’accord OGEE (2016-2017, 2017-2018, 2018-2019), les crédits parlementaires accordés à EACL pour le «déclassement nucléaire et la gestion des déchets radioactifs» s’élevaient en moyenne à 547 577 479 $ par année. C’est quatre fois plus que les 137 800 000 $ par année affectés pour la période 2006-2008 à 2015-2016 pendant laquelle Ressources naturelles Canada finançait les déclassements et la gestion des déchets dans le cadre du Programme des responsabilités nucléaires héritées.

Il ne semble pas qu’un financement accru ait donné de bons résultats. Les LNC, avec l’appui d’EACL, proposent trois projets qui ne respectent pas les engagements internationaux du Canada en matière de gestion responsable des déchets radioactifs:

Un site d’enfouissement hors-sol qui doit recevoir un million de mètres cubes de déchets radioactifs de «faible activité», dont d’importantes quantités d’émetteurs alpha et bêta / gamma à vie longue, à côté de la rivière des Outaouais à Chalk River, en Ontario. L’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) affirme que l’élimination en surface ne convient pas aux déchets qui incluent des radionucléides de longue vie. L’AIEA recommande d’isoler ces déchets de la biosphère à des dizaines de mètres sous la surface du sol, aussi longtemps qu’ils présenteront un risque radiologique (3).

La «mise en tombeau» du réacteur Whiteshell-1 en bordure de la rivière Winnipeg à Pinawa, au Manitoba, ainsi que celle du réacteur de la centrale nucléaire de démonstration, en bordure de la rivière des Outaouais à Rolphton en Ontario. Pendant la mise en tombeau, les restes fortement radioactifs du réacteur seraient recouverts de béton et laissés en place, même si les radionucléides qu’ils contiennent resteront dangereux pendant des centaines de milliers d’années après la défaillance de leur «tombe» en béton. L’AIEA ne recommande pas la mise au tombeau du réacteur, sauf en cas d’urgence (4).

Ces projets sont enlisés dans la controverse. Leur évaluation environnementale a été reportée en raison des nombreux commentaires critiques qu’ont formulés des organismes gouvernementaux provinciaux et fédéraux, des scientifiques à la retraite d’EACL, des Premières nations et des ONG. Le fait d’exiger par contrat «l’élimination de tous les déchets» la plus rapide et la moins chère incite de manière perverse à sous-estimer l’impact sanitaire et environnemental des projets, à imposer un fardeau excessif aux générations futures et à négliger les règles du développement durable.

Nous craignons que cette mise en tombeau ne soit aussi envisagée pour d’autres réacteurs nucléaires désaffectés de propriété fédérale, comme le réacteur Gentilly-1 à Bécancour au Québec, le réacteur Douglas Point près de Kincardine en Ontario et les réacteurs NRX et NRU à Chalk River en Ontario. Nous craignons également que le Canada ne fasse la promotion de cette mise en tombeau sur la scène internationale et qu’il ne fasse pression sur l’AIEA pour qu’elle permette la «mise en tombeau» lors des déclassements de routine.

La pétition 411 en matière d’environnement, soumise à votre bureau en septembre 2017, note que le gouvernement du Canada souffre d’un manque flagrant de politiques et de stratégies pour guider l’élimination ou la gestion à long terme des 600 000 mètres cubes de déchets radioactifs du gouvernement fédéral (5). Le gouvernement du Canada n’a publié qu’une «politique-cadre en matière de déchets radioactifs» qui tient en trois alinéas (6). Cette “politique-cadre”, développée sans discussion ni consultation publique, a maintenant plus de 20 ans. Elle stipule que les propriétaires de déchets doivent s’acquitter de leurs responsabilités «conformément aux plans approuvés d’évacuation des déchets». Cependant, le gouvernement du Canada, à titre de «propriétaire» de la vaste majorité des déchets radioactifs canadiens autre que le combustible irradié, n’a jamais publié de plan approuvé pour la gestion à long terme de ses propres déchets.

La Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire (CCSN) semble faire la promotion des trois projets d’évacuation des déchets nucléaires décrits ci-dessus. Comme autorité responsable en vertu de la Loi canadienne sur l’évaluation environnementale, la CCSN a entrepris des évaluations environnementales (EE) des projets même s’ils contreviennent aux directives de l’AIEA. La CCSN a écarté les mises en garde des experts scientifiques relatives aux graves lacunes des trois projets, pendant leur phase de description/définition de projet (7) (8) (9). Cela a permis aux LNC d’émettre des sous-contrats pour des études d’impact environnemental et pour la documentation justificative – un gaspillage de millions de dollars des fonds publics. La mauvaise gestion de ces évaluations environnementales par la CCSN fait l’objet de la pétition 413 en matière d’environnement qui a été soumise à votre bureau en janvier 2018 (10).

La CCSN est largement perçue comme victime d’une «capture du régulateur» (11). Dans la mesure où la CCSN sert les intérêts de l’industrie qu’elle devrait réglementer – plutôt que les intérêts des Canadiens actuels et futurs – cela crée du gaspillage et de l’improductivité. Nous croyons que le Canada manque de freins et de contrepoids dans son système de gouvernance nucléaire et qu’il faudrait renforcer le système en y impliquant plusieurs organismes et ministères.

Toutes ces préoccupations nous incitent à demander avec urgence que vous fassiez enquête pour savoir si le gouvernement du Canada, Énergie atomique du Canada limitée et la Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire dépensent de manière responsable les fonds publics destinés à la gestion des déchets nucléaires ou au déclassement des réacteurs nucléaires et s’ils traitent ces questions en conformité avec les règles du développement durable. Nous pensons qu’il est urgent de répondre à ces questions dès maintenant, alors que le Canada s’attaque tout juste à la tâche éminemment difficile et coûteuse de gérer de manière sécuritaire tous les déchets nucléaires que nous avons accumulés pendant plus de sept décennies.

Sincèrement vôtre,

Ole Hendrickson, Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area Theresa McClenaghan, Canadian Environmental Law Association

Chief James Marsden, Alderville First NationNorm Odjick, Director General, Algonquin Anishinabeg Nation Tribal Council Candace Day Neveau, Bawating Water Protectors

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance Beatrice Olivastri, Friends of the Earth Canada Brennain Lloyd, Northwatch

Cheryl Keetch, Ottawa River Institute
Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club Canada Foundation
Guy Garand, Conseil régional de l’environnement de Laval Jocelyne Sanschagrin, Coalition Eau Secours
Mark Mattson, Swim, Drink, Fish Canada
Meg Sears, Prevent Cancer Now
Nicole DesRoches, Agence de bassin versant des 7 Patrick Nadeau, Ottawa Riverkeeper
Rob Barnes, Ecology Ottawa

Shawn-Patrick Stensil, Greenpeace Canada

Dr. Éric Notebaert, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment Dr. Gordon Edwards, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility
Dr. P. T. Dang, Biodiversity Conservancy International

André Michel, Les Artistes pour la Paix
Carolynn Coburn, Environment Haliburton!
Céline Lachapelle, Action Environment Basses-Laurentides
Daniel Stringer, National Capital Peace Council
Dave Taylor, Concerned Citizens of Manitoba
Faye Moore, Port Hope Community Health Concerns Committee
Gareth Richardson, Green Coalition Verte
Georges Karpat, Coalition Vigilance Oléoducs
Gilles Provost and Ginette Charbonneau, Ralliement contre la pollution radioactive Jamie Kneen, Mining Watch
Johanna Echlin, Old Fort William (Quebec) Cottagers’ Association
John Jackson, Nulcear Waste Watch
Janet McNeill, Durham Nuclear Awareness
Kirk Groover, Petawawa Point Cottagers’ Association
Louise Morand, Comité vigilance hydrocarbures de L’Assomption
Marc Brullemans, Regroupement vigilance hydrocarbures Québec
Marlyn Rannou, l’Association pour la Préservation du Lac Témiscamingue
Martha Ruben, Ottawa Raging Grannies
Maryanne MacDonald, Water Care Allies, First United Church, Ottawa
Paul Johannis, Greenspace Alliance of Canada’s Capital
Réal Lalande, Action Climat Outaouais
Samuel Arnold, Sustainable Energy Group, New Brunswick
Siegfried (Ziggy) Kleinau, Bruce Peninsula Environment Group

cc.

The Right Hon. Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada
Chief Perry Bellegarde, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations
Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of Environment and Sustainable Development, Canada

The Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, Minister of Natural Resources, Canada
The Hon. Carolyn Bennett, MP, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Canada, The Hon. Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Canada The Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor, Minister of Health, Canada

The Hon. Elizabeth May, Leader of the Green Party of Canada The Hon. Luc Thériault, Groupe parlementaire québécois

The Hon. Mario Beaulieu, Bloc Québécois

The Hon. Erin O’Toole, Conservative Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic, Canada
The Hon. Shannon Stubbs, Conservative Party of Canada Natural Resources Critic
The Hon. Marilyn Gladu, Conservative Party of Canada, Health Critic
The Hon. Ed Fast, Conservative Party of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Critic The Hon. Hélène Laverdière, NDP Foreign Affairs Critic

The Hon. Richard Cannings, NDP Natural Resources Critic The Hon. Don Davies, NDP Health Critic

The Hon. Alexandre Boulerice, NDP Environment and Climate Change Critic The Hon. Monique Pauzé, Groupe parlementaire québécois Environment Critic

The Hon. Isabelle Melançon, MNA, Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change, Québec
The Hon. Chris Ballard, MPP, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, Ontario
The Hon. Rochelle Squires, MLA, Minister of Sustainable Development, Manitoba

Références

(1) Rapport du vérificateur général du Canada au Conseil d’administration d’Énergie atomique du Canada limitée — Examen spécial — 2017 Cat. No. FA3-126/2017 http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/Francais/parl_oag_201711_07_f_42672.html

(2) ) Responsabilités nucléaires héritées du Canada : Le coût du nettoyage des Laboratoires de Chalk River, pétition 405 en matière d’environnement, adressée au vérificateur général du Canada le 20 juin 2017. Sommaire et réponse: http://www.oag- bvg.gc.ca/internet/Francais/pet_405_f_42449.html

Texte complet de la pétition: https://tinyurl.com/environmental-petition-405

(3) IAEA 2009. Policies and Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management.
Nuclear Energy Series Guide No. NW-G-1.1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, https://wwwpub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1093_scr.pdf.

(4) IAEA 2011. Policies and Strategies for the Decommissioning of Nuclear and Radiological Facilities. Nuclear Energy Series No. NW-G-2.1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. https://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1525_web.pdf

(5) Politiques et stratégies de gestion des déchets radioactifs non combustibles, pétition 411 en matière d’environnement, adressée au vérificateur général du Canada le 21 septembre 2017.
Sommaire et réponse: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/Francais/pet_411_f_42850.html Texte complet de la pétition: https://tinyurl.com/AG-petition-411

(6) Politique-cadre en matière de déchets radioactifs , Ressources naturelles Canada, Ottawa, 1996. https://www.rncan.gc.ca/energie/uranium-nucleaire/7726

(7) Tableau des observations du public et des groupes autochtones sur la description du Projet d’installation de gestion des déchets près de la surface (IGDS)

http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80122/118862F.pdf

(8) Tableau des commentaires du public et des groupes autochtones sur la description du Projet de fermeture du réacteur nucléaire de démonstration

http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80121/118857F.pdf

(9) Tableau des observations du public et des groupes autochtones sur la description du projet – Déclassement in situ du réacteur nucléaire de Whiteshell-1

http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80124/118863F.pdf

(10) Évaluation environnementale des projets nucléaires , pétition 413 en matière d’environnement, adressée au vérificateur général du Canada le 29 janvier 2018.

Sommaire et réponse: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/Francais/pet_413_f_43085.html Texte complet de la pétition: https://tinyurl.com/Environmental-Petition-413

(11) Bâtir un terrain d’entente : une nouvelle vision pour l’évaluation des impacts au Canada,

Rapport final du comité d’experts, https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/themes/ environment/conservation/environmental-reviews/building-common-ground/batir-terrain- entente.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s