Letter to IAEA Director General from First Nations and civil society groups

Le français suit

April 23, 2018

Mr. Yukiya Amano, Director General International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Vienna International Centre
PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna, Austria

Dear Mr. Amano

We are writing to express as an urgent matter our deep concern that Canada is failing to meet its commitments under the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. Canada is in our view failing to manage its radioactive wastes in a responsible manner that would protect its citizens and avoid placing excessive burdens on future generations. We would like to bring to your attention the following:

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is currently
conducting environmental assessments of three project proposals for permanent disposal of the federal government’s own radioactive wastes that we believe are completely out of alignment with IAEA guidance.

A giant, above-ground landfill for one million cubic meters of “low level” radioactive waste, including significant quantities of long-lived alpha and beta/gamma emitters, is proposed to be built beside the Ottawa River at Chalk River, Ontario. IAEA guidance states that near-surface disposal is not suitable for waste with long-lived radionuclides, because a “disposal facility at or near the surface makes it susceptible to processes and events that will degrade its containment and isolation capacity over much shorter periods of time” (1).

Nuclear reactor “entombment” projects are proposed for the Whiteshell-1 reactor beside the Winnipeg River in Pinawa Manitoba; and for the Nuclear Power Demonstration reactor beside the Ottawa River at Rolphton, Ontario. The IAEA does not recommend reactor entombment except in emergencies (2).

Canada has not developed policies and strategies for radioactive waste management as recommended by the IAEA (3). A recent petition to the Auditor General of Canada notes that Canada is grossly deficient in policies and strategies to guide the disposal or long-term management of the federal government’s 600,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste (excluding irradiated nuclear fuel), much of it a byproduct of nuclear weapons production activities during the Cold War era.(4)

Canada has not developed a national classification system applicable to radioactive waste disposal despite having been asked about this several times during the IAEA peer review process (2). Canada’s classification system allows long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium to be classified as “low level” and makes no mention of keeping these substances contained and isolated from the biosphere.

The federal government, which has responsibility for radioactive waste policy, has only ever released a “framework” composed of three bullets. (5) This “radioactive waste policy framework”, developed with no public discussion or consultation, is now more than 20 years old. It states that waste owners must meet their responsibilities “in accordance with approved waste disposal plans,” but the Government of Canada, as “owner” of the vast majority of Canada’s non-fuel radioactive wastes, has never released an approved plan for long-term management of its own wastes.

If Canada had radioactive waste policies and plans that conform to IAEA guidance we do not believe that the three current proposals would have reached the environmental assessment stage. Canada is proposing to abandon long-lived radionuclides at or near the surface, at sites chosen for convenience rather than for long-term safety. Canada has never conducted a proper siting process for non-fuel radioactive wastes, either for a near-surface disposal facility or for a geological facility.

CNSC – far from intervening to address these problems – is in our view compounding them. It dismissed warnings from scientific experts about serious flaws in the three proposals during the project description phase (6) (7) (8). We are advised that it provided incomplete and misleading information about them in its recent report to the Joint Convention (9). CNSC is widely perceived to be subject to “regulatory capture. (10). As a regulatory body, not a policy-making body, CNSC’s so-called “regulatory policy” guides are no substitute for government policy. Canada lacks checks and balances and the involvement of multiple agencies and departments that in our view are needed to strengthen its nuclear governance system.

We believe that an IAEA investigation and report on Canada’s radioactive waste management policies and practices is urgently needed. We also request that IAEA review Canada’s nuclear governance with a view to providing recommendations that would address serious current deficiencies.

We look forward very much to receiving your assistance in these very important matters.

Yours sincerely,

Grand-Chief Patrick Madahbee, Anishinabek Nation
Chief James Marsden, Alderville First Nation
Chief Joanne G. Rogers, Aamjiwnaang First Nation
Chief Rodney Noganosh, Chippewas of Rama First Nation 
Chief Shining Turtle, Whitefish River First Nations
Candace Day Neveau, Bawating Water Protectors

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance
Alain Saladzius, Fondation Rivières
Beatrice Olivastri, Friends of the Earth Canada
Benoit Delage, Conseil Régional de l’Environnement et du Développement Durable de l’Outaouais
Carole Dupuis, Regroupement vigilance hydrocarbures Québec
Christian Simard, Nature Québec
Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club of Canada
Martine Chatelain, Eau Secours!
Meredith Brown, Ottawa Riverkeeper
Nicole DesRoches, Agence de bassin versant des 7
Robb Barnes, Ecology Ottawa
Shawn-Patrick Stensil, Greenpeace Canada
Theresa McClenaghan, Canadian Environmental Law Association

Dr. Éric Notebaert, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment Dr. Gordon Edwards, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility
Dr. Ole Hendrickson, Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area
Dr. P. T. Dang, Biodiversity Conservancy International

André Michel, Les Artistes pour la Paix
Barry Stemshorn, Pontiac Environmental Protection
Carolynn Coburn, Environment Haliburton!
Céline Lachapelle, Action Environment Basses-Laurentides
Dave Taylor, Concerned Citizens of Manitoba
Gareth Richardson, Green Coalition Verte
Georges Karpat, Coalition Vigilance Oléoducs
Gilles Provost and Ginette Charbonneau, Ralliement contre la pollution radioactive 
Jamie Kneen, Mining Watch
Johanna Echlin, Old Fort William (Quebec) Cottagers’ Association
John Jackson, Nulcear Waste Watch
Janet McNeill, Durham Nuclear Awareness
Kirk Groover, Petawawa Point Cottagers’ Association
Marc Fafard, Sept-Îles Sans Uranium
Marie Durand, Alerte Pétrole Rive-Sud
Mario Gervais, l’Association pour la Préservation du Lac Témiscamingue
Maryanne MacDonald, Water Care Allies, First United Church, Ottawa
Nadia Alexan, Citizens in Action
Pascal Bergeron, Environnement Vert Plus
Patrick Rasmussen, Mouvement Vert Mauricie
Paul Johannis, Greenspace Alliance of Canada’s Capital
Réal Lalande, STOP Oléoduc Outaouais

cc.

The Right Hon. Justin Trudeau, PC MP, Prime Minister of Canada
Chief Perry Bellegarde, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations
Mr. Michael Ferguson, Auditor General of Canada
Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of Environment and Sustainable Development,Canada
H. E. Ambassador Mark Bailey, Permanent Representative of Canada to the IAEA
The Hon. Carolyn Bennett, PC MP, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Canada, 

The Hon. Catherine McKenna, PC MP, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Canada
The Hon. Chrystia Freeland, PC MP, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Canada
The Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC MP, Minister of Health, Canada 

The Hon. Jim Carr, PC MP, Minister of Natural Resources, Canada
The Hon. Elizabeth May, MP, Leader of the Green Party of Canada 

The Hon. Luc Thériault, MP, Groupe parlementaire québécois
The Hon. Mario Beaulieu, MP, Bloc Québécois
The Hon. Erin O’Toole, MP, Conservative Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic, Canada
The Hon. Shannon Stubbs, MP, Conservative Party of Canada Natural Resources Critic
The Hon. Marilyn Gladu, MP, Conservative Party of Canada, Health Critic The Hon. Ed Fast, MP, Conservative Party of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Critic
The Hon. Hélène Laverdière, MP, NDP Foreign Affairs Critic
The Hon. Richard Cannings, MP, NDP Natural Resources Critic
The Hon. Don Davies, MP, NDP Health Critic
The Hon. Alexandre Boulerice, MP, NDP Environment and Climate Change Critic 

The Hon. Monique Pauzé, MP, Groupe parlementaire québécois Environment Critic
Geoff Williams, Chair, Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC)
Sandra Geupel, WASSC Scientific Secretary
The Hon. Isabelle Melançon, MNA, Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change, Québec
The Hon. Chris Ballard, MPP, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, Ontario 

The Hon. Rochelle Squires, MLA, Minister of Sustainable Development, Manitoba

References

(1) Near Surface Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste. Specific Safety Guide No. SSG-29. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2014.https://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1637_web.pdf
(2) Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements Part 6. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2014. https://www- pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1652web-83896570.pdf

(3) Policies and Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management. Nuclear Energy Series Guide No. NW-G-1.1. International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 2009.https://wwwpub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1093_scr. pdf.

(4) Policies and Strategies for Managing Non-Fuel Radioactive Waste. Petition number 411 to the Auditor General of Canada, September 21, 2017, summary and response at http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/pet_411_e_42850.html, full text of petition at https://tinyurl.com/AG-petition-411

(5) Radioactive Waste Policy Framework. Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, 1996. https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy/uranium-nuclear/7725

(6) CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Near Surface Disposal Facility Project. http://www.ceaa- acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80122/118862E.pdf
(7) CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Nuclear Power Demonstration Closure Project. http://www.ceaa- acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80121/118857E.pdf

(8) CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – In Situ Decommissioning of Whiteshell Reactor #1 Project.http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80124/118863E.pdf

(9) Letter to Mr. Yukiya Amano of the IAEA from Mr. Ole Hendrickson of Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area, “IAEA Review of Canada’s Radioactive Waste Management Practices”. March 5, 2018.

(10) Building Common Ground: A New Vision for Impact Assessment in Canada. The final report of the Expert Panel for the Review of Environmental Assessment Processes. April 2017.https://www.canada.ca/en/services/environment/conservation/assessments/environ mental-reviews/environmental-assessment-processes/building-common-ground.html

Le 23 avril 2018

M. Yukiya Amano, directeur général
Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) Centre international de Vienne
BP 100, 1400 Vienne, Autriche

Cher Monsieur Amano.

Nous vous écrivons d’urgence pour exprimer à quel point nous sommes préoccupés de voir le Canada manquer à ses engagements en vertu de la Convention commune sur lasûreté de la gestion du combustible usé et sur la sûreté de la gestion des déchets radioactifs. À notre avis, le Canada n’arrive pas à gérer ses déchets radioactifs de manière responsable afin de protéger ses citoyens sans fardeau excessif pour les générations futures. Nous aimerions attirer surtout votre attention sur les éléments suivants:

La Commission canadienne de sûreté nucléaire (CCSN) procède actuellement à l’évaluation environnementale de trois projets d’élimination permanente des déchets radioactifs du gouvernement fédéral qui sont en complet désaccord avec les directives de l’AIEA.

On veut notamment aménager à la surface du sol une décharge géante qui recevrait un million de mètres cubes de déchets radioactifs de «faible activité», dont d’importantes quantités d’émetteurs à vie longue de rayonnements alpha et bêta / gamma , près de la rivière des Outaouais à Chalk River en Ontario. Les directives de l’AIEA stipulent pourtant qu’une installation en surface ne convient pas à l’élimination des radionucléides à vie longue, car ” cette localisation près de la surface rend l’installation vulnérable aux processus ou événements qui vont dégrader trop rapidement sa capacité de confinement et d’isolement. “(1).

On a aussi l’intention de bétonner en place deux réacteurs nucléaires: celui deWhiteshell-1 en bordure de la rivière Winnipeg à Pinawa au Manitoba ainsi que celui de la centrale Nuclear Power Demonstration en bordure de la rivière des Outaouais à Rolphton en Ontario. L’AIEA ne recommande pas le bétonnage in situ des réacteurs, sauf en cas d’urgence (2).

Le Canada n’a pas élaboré de politiques et de stratégies pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, malgré les recommandations de l’AIEA (3). Une récente pétition adressée à la vérificatrice générale du Canada rappelait que le Canada n’a ni politique ni stratégie pour encadrer l’élimination ou la gestion à long terme de 600 000 mètres cubes de déchets radioactifs (en excluant le combustible irradié). Ces déchets appartiennent au Gouvernement fédéral et proviennent surtout de la production de plutonium pendant la Guerre Froide. (4)

Le Canada ne s’est donné aucun système national de classification des déchets radioactifs en vue de leur élimination, même s’il a souvent été interrogé à ce sujet dans le cadre du processus d’examen par les pairs de l’AIEA (2). Le système de classification

du Canada permet de classer des radionucléides à longue vie comme le plutonium parmi les déchets de “faible activité» et n’impose pas que ces substances soient confinées et isolées de la biosphère.

Le gouvernement fédéral, qui est responsable de la politique sur les déchets radioactifs, n’a publié qu’un «cadre» en trois alinéas. (5) Adopté sans discussion ni consultation publique, ce «cadre» est maintenant âgé de plus de 20 ans. Il stipule que les propriétaires de déchets doivent s’acquitter de leurs responsabilités «conformément aux plans approuvés d’évacuation des déchets ». Même si le gouvernement du Canada est «propriétaire» de la grande majorité des déchets radioactifs canadiens qui ne sont pas du combustible irradié, il n’a jamais publié de plan approuvé pour la gestion à long terme de ses propres déchets.

Si le Canada avait des politiques et des plans conformes aux directives de l’AIEA pour les déchets radioactifs, nous sommes convaincus que les trois projets actuels n’auraient pas atteint l’étape de l’évaluation environnementale. Le Canada propose d’abandonner des radionucléides à vie longue en surface ou près de la surface, dans des sites retenus pour leur commodité plutôt que pour leur sécurité à long terme. Le Canada n’a jamais procédé à la sélection systématique d’un emplacement approprié aux déchets radioactifs autres que le combustible irradié, que ce soit pour une installation d’élimination en surface ou en couche géologique profonde.

Nous avons l’impression que la CCSN aggrave ces problèmes plutôt que d’essayer de les régler. Elle a écarté les mises en garde des experts scientifiques contre les graves lacunes des trois projets à l’étape de la description de projet.(6) (7) (8) On nous signale aussi qu’elle a fourni des informations partielles et trompeuses à leur sujet dans son récent rapport à la Convention commune. (9) On dit souvent que la CCSN est victime d’une «capture réglementaire». (10) Puisqu’elle est un organisme de réglementation et non un organisme politique, ses soi-disant guides de «politiques de réglementation» ne peuvent se substituer à une politique gouvernementale. Le Canada manque d’un régime de freins et de contrepoids dans lequel plusieurs organismes et ministères participeraient à la gouvernance nucléaire.

Nous croyons que l’AIEA doit enquêter de toute urgence et faire rapport sur les politiques et les pratiques de gestion des déchets radioactifs au Canada. Nous aimerions également demander à l’AIEA d’examiner la gouvernance nucléaire du Canada en vue de formuler des recommandations pour corriger les graves lacunes actuelles.

Nous comptons beaucoup sur votre aide dans ces importants dossiers . Cordialement,

Grand-Chief Patrick Madahbee, Anishinabek Nation
Chief James Marsden, Alderville First Nation
Chief Joanne G. Rogers, Aamjiwnaang First Nation
Chief Rodney Noganosh, Chippewas of Rama First Nation 
Chief Shining Turtle, Whitefish River First Nations
Candace Day Neveau, Bawating Water Protectors

Angela Bischoff, Ontario Clean Air Alliance
Alain Saladzius, Fondation Rivières
Beatrice Olivastri, Friends of the Earth Canada
Benoit Delage, Conseil Régional de l’Environnement et du Développement Durable de l’Outaouais
Carole Dupuis, Regroupement vigilance hydrocarbures Québec
Christian Simard, Nature Québec
Gretchen Fitzgerald, Sierra Club of Canada
Martine Chatelain, Eau Secours!
Meredith Brown, Ottawa Riverkeeper
Nicole DesRoches, Agence de bassin versant des 7
Robb Barnes, Ecology Ottawa
Shawn-Patrick Stensil, Greenpeace Canada
Theresa McClenaghan, Canadian Environmental Law Association

Dr. Éric Notebaert, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment Dr. Gordon Edwards, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility
Dr. Ole Hendrickson, Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area
Dr. P. T. Dang, Biodiversity Conservancy International

André Michel, Les Artistes pour la Paix
Barry Stemshorn, Pontiac Environmental Protection
Carolynn Coburn, Environment Haliburton!
Céline Lachapelle, Action Environment Basses-Laurentides
Dave Taylor, Concerned Citizens of Manitoba
Gareth Richardson, Green Coalition Verte
Georges Karpat, Coalition Vigilance Oléoducs
Gilles Provost and Ginette Charbonneau, Ralliement contre la pollution radioactive 
Jamie Kneen, Mining Watch
Johanna Echlin, Old Fort William (Quebec) Cottagers’ Association
John Jackson, Nulcear Waste Watch
Janet McNeill, Durham Nuclear Awareness
Kirk Groover, Petawawa Point Cottagers’ Association
Marc Fafard, Sept-Îles Sans Uranium
Marie Durand, Alerte Pétrole Rive-Sud
Mario Gervais, l’Association pour la Préservation du Lac Témiscamingue
Maryanne MacDonald, Water Care Allies, First United Church, Ottawa
Nadia Alexan, Citizens in Action
Pascal Bergeron, Environnement Vert Plus
Patrick Rasmussen, Mouvement Vert Mauricie
Paul Johannis, Greenspace Alliance of Canada’s Capital
Réal Lalande, STOP Oléoduc Outaouais

cc.

The Right Hon. Justin Trudeau, PC MP, Prime Minister of Canada
Chief Perry Bellegarde, Chief of the Assembly of First Nations
Mr. Michael Ferguson, Auditor General of Canada
Ms. Julie Gelfand, Commissioner of Environment and Sustainable Development,Canada
H. E. Ambassador Mark Bailey, Permanent Representative of Canada to the IAEA
The Hon. Carolyn Bennett, PC MP, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations, Canada, 

The Hon. Catherine McKenna, PC MP, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Canada
The Hon. Chrystia Freeland, PC MP, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Canada
The Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor, PC MP, Minister of Health, Canada 

The Hon. Jim Carr, PC MP, Minister of Natural Resources, Canada
The Hon. Elizabeth May, MP, Leader of the Green Party of Canada 

The Hon. Luc Thériault, MP, Groupe parlementaire québécois
The Hon. Mario Beaulieu, MP, Bloc Québécois
The Hon. Erin O’Toole, MP, Conservative Party of Canada Foreign Affairs Critic, Canada
The Hon. Shannon Stubbs, MP, Conservative Party of Canada Natural Resources Critic
The Hon. Marilyn Gladu, MP, Conservative Party of Canada, Health Critic The Hon. Ed Fast, MP, Conservative Party of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Critic
The Hon. Hélène Laverdière, MP, NDP Foreign Affairs Critic
The Hon. Richard Cannings, MP, NDP Natural Resources Critic
The Hon. Don Davies, MP, NDP Health Critic
The Hon. Alexandre Boulerice, MP, NDP Environment and Climate Change Critic 

The Hon. Monique Pauzé, MP, Groupe parlementaire québécois Environment Critic
Geoff Williams, Chair, Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC)
Sandra Geupel, WASSC Scientific Secretary
The Hon. Isabelle Melançon, MNA, Minister of Sustainable Development, the Environment and the Fight against Climate Change, Québec
The Hon. Chris Ballard, MPP, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, Ontario 

The Hon. Rochelle Squires, MLA, Minister of Sustainable Development, Manitoba

Références
(1) Installations d’élimination des déchets radioactifs à proximité des surfaces. Sécurité spécifique Guide n ° SSG-29. Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique, Vienne. AIEA 2014. (2) Déclassement des installations. Prescriptions générales de sécurité Partie 6. Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique, Vienne. AIEA 2014. https://www- pub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/P1652_F_web.pdf

(3) Politiques et stratégies de gestion des déchets radioactifs. Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique. Guide de la série sur l’énergie nucléaire no NW-G-1.1. AIEA 2009.https://wwwpub.iaea.org/MTCD/Publications/PDF/Pub1093_scr.pdf.
(4) «Politiques et stratégies de gestion des déchets radioactifs autres que le combustible», pétition numéro 411 adressée à la vérificatrice générale du Canada, 21 septembre 2017, résumé et réponse à http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/pet_411_e_42850.html, texte complet de la pétition à https://tinyurl.com/AG- petition-411

(5) Politique-cadre en matière de déchets radioactifs. Ressources naturelles Canada 1996. https://www.rncan.gc.ca/energie/uranium-nucleaire/7726
(6) –en anglais– CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Near Surface Disposal Facility Project. http://www.ceaa- acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80122/118862E.pdf

(7) –en anglais– CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – Nuclear Power Demonstration Closure Project.http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80121/118857E.pdf
(8) –en anglais– CNSC Disposition Table of Public and Aboriginal Groups’ Comments on Project Description – In Situ Decommissioning of Whiteshell Reactor #1 Project.http://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/p80124/118863E.pdf

(9) Lettre à M. Yukiya Amano de l’AIEA de la part de M. Ole Hendrickson au nom des Concerned Citizens of Renfrew County and Area, “IAEA Review of Canada’s Radioactive Waste Management Practices”, le 5 mars 2018.
(10) BÂTIR UN TERRAIN D’ENTENTE: une nouvelle vision pour l’évaluation des impacts au Canada. Le rapport final du comité d’experts pour l’examen des processus d’évaluation environnementale Avril 2017.https://www.canada.ca/fr/services/environnement/conservation/evaluation/examens- environnementaux/processus-evaluation-environnementale/batir-terrain-entente.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s